How to paint like Mark Rothko – No 16 Red, Brown, and Black – with Corey D’Augustine | IN THE STUDIO

How to paint like Mark Rothko – No 16 Red, Brown, and Black – with Corey D’Augustine | IN THE STUDIO

(somber piano music) Voiceover: In the 1950s, Mark Rothko explored how forms could float in space, sometimes advancing toward you, other times quietly receding away from you. Now by looking at his paintings, there’s a number of ways that we could discern how these effects are achieved. However, Rothko was notoriously hermetic about his studio

How to paint like Franz Kline – with Corey D’Augustine | IN THE STUDIO

How to paint like Franz Kline – with Corey D’Augustine | IN THE STUDIO

(jazz music) Voiceover: Around 1960, when Franz Kline had started selling some paintings, making some money, he had been working almost exclusively with house paint. Now, Sidney Janis, his gallerist, didn’t like that idea so much, perhaps because he was looking for fine art prices, not hardware store prices. What he did one night, was

Can robots be creative? – Gil Weinberg

Can robots be creative? – Gil Weinberg

How does this music make you feel? Do you find it beautiful? Is it creative? Now, would you change your answers if you learned the composer was this robot? Believe it or not, people have been grappling with the question of artificial creativity, alongside the question of artifcial intelligence, for over 170 years. In 1843,

Meet a Scientologist: Japanese Stone Artist & Sculptor

Meet a Scientologist: Japanese Stone Artist & Sculptor

NARRATOR: His passion is transforming stone… into timeless works of art. YOSHIKAWA: What my hope is that other people would get from my art is that it puts them in touch with some aspect of themselves that elevates them. After doing it for over 30 years, I just feel like I’m getting started.

Tony Cragg – ‘Be There, See It, Respond to It’ | TateShots

Tony Cragg – ‘Be There, See It, Respond to It’ | TateShots

This was the very first one, this was actually found by my brother Nigel. You won’t believe how beautiful this is by the way, look at that. And that’s the very first fossil we found but we thought it was a miracle. You know people ask where the ideas come from. What I don’t know

Aki Sasamoto: An Artist Walks into a Bar | Art21 “New York Close Up”

Aki Sasamoto: An Artist Walks into a Bar | Art21 “New York Close Up”

[Wrong happy hour, 10am–6pm] [“An Artist Walks into a Bar”] [AKI SASAMOTO] I got a kidney condition. The doctor stopped me from drinking, for three months or so. By the time three months was up, I found out I was pregnant. [Aki Sasamoto, Artist] So I couldn’t drink nine more months, and I was going

“Great Force” at The Institute for Contemporary Art

“Great Force” at The Institute for Contemporary Art

>>ICA is a unique place for several reasons. It allows us to bring contemporary art to Richmond in a way that is based in research, it’s based in inquiry, it allows us to be open and experimental and to respond specifically to the needs of a larger art world or the community. One thing that

Kinetic Sculpture – Art-O-Motion – Lesson Plan

Kinetic Sculpture – Art-O-Motion – Lesson Plan

JULIE: Hi, I’m Julie Davis with Blick Art Materials. Kinetic art is designed to incorporate motion. In 1913, Marcel Duchamp mounted a spinning bicycle wheel onto a stool to make what we consider to be the first kinetic sculpture. It required touch to make it move. Other artists have used motors, air currents, water, and

Elia: The World’s Most Frustrating Work of Art

Elia: The World’s Most Frustrating Work of Art

I reckon that this dome, here on a windswept field in Denmark, is the world’s most frustrating work of art. I know that’s a bold claim, so let me explain: this is Elia, designed by an artist called Ingvar Cronhammar. He’s famous for dark, industrial art, art that looks like machinery, art that looks alienating